advertisement
advertisement
The Veritas Health Forum is moving! On September 30, 2020, this Forum will no longer be available. Please read important information about the changes here.

Denial of coverage for Anesthesia

In late June I had a steroid injection into my C-6/C-7 vertebrae to address nerve pain that was radiating down my back and shoulders. At the start of the procedure I was injected with Propofol. My Health Insurance (Cigna) has paid all costs with the exception of the Anesthesia which they contend was not 'medically necessary'. I had a similar procedure on my lower back several years ago and the cost of the Anesthesia was not questioned, so this rejection was a surprise to me.

Is Anesthesia typically used for a Cervical Steroid Injection? I am planning on contesting this denial of coverage and would like to have a valid argument that supports the medical necessity of having Anesthesia for this procedure.

advertisement

Comments

  • Usually for a spinal injection, at least with my experience in having many. They do not use propofal. They usually use verced and dilaudid or something similar to sedate you. They have never put me to sleep for a spinal injection. Hope this helps. 

    Chris

  • Welcome ptan we’re glad you’re here!

    I have never had a cervical injection, but I have had several lumbar injections and they have never used anesthesia for them, they use a numbing medication.

    While you’re waiting for a reply to your first post, please take a few moments to review the Code of Conduct and FAQ section, located under Forum Tools. There you will find important information about posting in the forum and helpful tips for new members.

    Have you visited the Neck Pain Health Center on Spine-health? It has a comprehensive list of neck pain articles you might find helpful, including Common Causes of Neck Pain, Home Remedies for Neck Pain and Dizziness, and How to Treat a Stiff Neck.  

    Again, welcome to the Veritas Health Forum.

    Chip 

    Veritas Health Forum Moderator

  • advertisement
  • memerainboltmemerainbolt IndianaPosts: 4,713

    I have also had several injections and have never been put to sleep. That may be why you're insurance did not cover it because they usually just use a numbing agent.

  • Also. I have had friends of mine that have had procedures such as this and the Anastesiologist they hired for the procedure was out of network as far as the insurance is concerned. A good friend of mine ended up with a $7000.00 bill because the doctor performing the procedure on him hired an out of network anastesiologist. Doesn't really make sense I know. But it does happen.

    Chris

  • I’ve had injections without sedation and with and prefer sedation. I think they can contact your PM Dr. or get a form from your insurance saying it’s necessary for you to get this sedation.

     I’ve heard others just take a. oral sedative but you have to call your insurance to see if you can get the form so your Dr approves it. so insurance will pay perhaps. 

    I’m so glad we have mostly free healthcare but some things we need private insurance in my country. 


  • advertisement
  • Man, am I glad to live in Belgium. My acdf surgery was 5000 euro, which is roughly 6000 usd. Our healthcare paid half of it. My insurance paid the other half. I ended up paying 125 euro. Which is roughly 150 usd. You guys should 'shop' abroad. I looked at how much acdf costs in usa and in uk. Crazy expensive. Same goes for studying. Almost free over here. We do pay an insane amount of taxes though. More then half of what we earn goes directly or indirectly to taxes.

advertisement
Sign In or Join Us to comment.