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Something has GOT to give

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  • edited 11/27/2013 - 4:23 AM
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  • dilauroddilauro ConnecticutPosts: 12,303
    the location of a herniated disc without a MRI. Based on some clinical examinations, they may be able to 'suspect' which level, since each of them can and will present different symptoms.
    DDD (Degenerative Disc Disease) and Sciatica are terms that get used so often. DDD is overplayed, since it really is the physical aging of our spines. Everyone as they get older will show some signs of DDD. But sciatica, you have to know what is causing that! Some nerve root is being impinged.
    Your therapist does need to know the disc causing the problem. How the treatment for those nerves can differ. Unless your doctor specifically wrote a script to work on your L5/S1, I dont know how much a therapist can do.
    Asking for a MRI! That might not be as easy. Most of the time, when patients ask/demand/request a specific test or medication, doctors back off a bit. For some, its an ego thing. they want to be the ones to make those types of decisions.
    Instead, you could just talk to your doctor, let them know the problems you therapist is having (but by now, the therapist would have needed to provide feedback to your doctor, so to know that, would be interesting) and are you sure its disc L5/S1! Could it be another disc? Questions like that should led the doctor into thinking MRI themselves.
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  • dilauroddilauro ConnecticutPosts: 12,303
    perhaps you need to have your physical therapist contact your doctor to express their concerns regarding your treatment.
    All prescriptions for physical therapy are written by the doctor with specific instructions as to what area needs to be worked on. If the therapist can not do that or is having problems, then they need to speak to the doctor.

    I agree, spending the $500 in co-pays is a lot of money, especially if it is really not addressing your major problem area.
    Even if your appointment is 6 weeks away, the therapist contact with the doctor is only a phone call away.
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